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River District Burgundy Offer 2021

I proudly present the River District Burgundy Offer for 2021. I’ve been collecting tiny batches over the course of this year, often just a case each, so that I could bring you a diverse, balanced selection over many regions and prices. There are pricy wines here to be sure, but Burgundy still has good deals if you know where to look (I do). If you’re a Burgundy lover and you aren’t interested in anything here…. stop it. Yes you are. 

No way around it, this is a beast. It’s a long and storied list of wines from the Cote d’Or, Maconnais and Chablis, so take your time with it (and feel free to share it with fellow Burgheads), but not too much time because I can’t really “hold” anything, just come in to River District or call me with payment to secure the wines. Cool? Cool. 

Visit Jordan in the Vintages Room at our River District location.

  • 8570 River District Crossing
  • 604 416 1672
  • jcarrier@everythingwine.ca

We begin with unicorns shooting rainbows out of their horns: 

Maison Leroy. No sense burying the lede: I have back-vintaged Leroy. This hasn’t happened before and won’t again: it is only because of the (gestures broadly at everything) past 18 months that wines like this even left France. Madame Lalou Bize-Leroy ran Domaine de la Romanée-Conti (DRC) for nearly 20 years and is still the majority shareholder, but now runs her late father’s negoçe Maison Leroy as well as Domaine Leroy (much younger than Maison, established in the late ‘80s). Behind DRC, Leroy is the second most sought Burgundy in the world, which is why it’s nutbar that I actually could get the following: 

Maison Leroy Morey-Saint-Denis (Pinot Noir) 1984. An exercise in sublimity with floral notes, dried raspberries, balsamic and baked plum. Evolves in front of you, but the lively acidity on the close keeps everything fresh. 6 bottles available, $1727.98 +tax 

Maison Leroy Saint-Aubin (Pinot Noir) 1993. A rare Saint-Aubin red. Soft echoes of strawberries and roses under tilled earth, with gamey dried fig and plum notes continuing from front to back. 6 bottles available, $2199.98 +tax 

Maison Leroy Volnay (Pinot Noir) 2003. An expert balance of elegance and power, with vibrant black cherry and blackberry leading the nose, with slight green herb notes and barrel influence. Great acidity, another 20 years is possible but perfect now. 6 bottles available, $2132.98 +tax 

Maison Leroy Nuits-Saint-Georges (Pinot Noir) 2013. Randy and kicking, with spicy cassis, fresh plum and ferrous notes. Still tightly wound and fresher than early ‘90s Will Smith. 6 bottles available, $1983.98 +tax 

 

CÔTE D’OR 

Domaine Robert Groffier Père & Fils. The largest landowner in the cult-inspiring Amoureuses 1er Cru comes into it honestly and generationally: current vigneron Nicolas Groffier is the 4th Groffier to wrest power and beauty from Pinot in the Côte de Nuits. The house style can best be described as terroir-informed pragmatism, Nicolas doesn’t dogmatically hue to one way of winemaking (i.e. whole cluster vs. destemming), he lets the vineyard tell him what to do, an easy decision when you have dirt like this: 

Groffier Chambolle-Musigny 1er Cru Les Amoureuses (Pinot Noir) 2017. The Premier Cru that self identifies as a Grand Cru (with good reason), and Nicolas owns the biggest and arguably best chunk of it. 50% whole cluster pressing, 25% new oak. A fresh, autumn rain vibe underscores the violets, raspberries, cherries and spice. 5 bottles available, $904.98 +tax 

Groffier Bonnes Mares Grand Cru (Pinot Noir) 2017. Nestled on the border of two villages (Chambolle-Musigny and Morey-Saint-Denis) and adjacent to the Clos de Tart Grand Cru (more on them below), Bonnes Mares can ripen Pinot more than its neighbors, so this is a tad fatter than most 2017s you’ll find. A high intensity of floral aromatics over brambly fruit and blueberries. Slight note of soy and anise. Hella fresh delivery from the 100% whole cluster pressing that balances the weight. 6 bottles available, $904.98 +tax 

Groffier Chambolle-Musigny Les Sentiers (Pinot Noir) 2017. The northernmost Cru of the village. 100% whole cluster pressing from 80-year-old vines. Slight notes of smoke and pine lift the racy cherry and potpourri aromas. Silky deployment with black current lingering on the long finish. 6 bottles available, $369.98 +tax 

 

Clos de Tart. Another once-in-a-blue-moon acquisition for me, I don’t expect to see it again. The largest of the 5 Grand Cru Monopoles in Burgundy (Monopole = one house owns the whole Cru, a near-impossibility under the Napoleonic Laws of Inheritance), Clos de Tart has only had 4 owners since 1141 (it’s now owned by Chateau Latour). Founded by the “Tart” nuns, this stone-walled vineyard adjacent to Bonnes Mares is unique in the Côte de Nuits, in that it’s planted to both north and south exposure, whereas most Crus face south, giving an elegant twist to the ripe Pinot grown there. I have two vintages: 

Clos de Tart Grand Cru Monopole (Pinot Noir) 2018. Deceptively light on its feet, hiding the massive power on the back end. 55% whole cluster pressing. Plum and rose aromas atop cinnamon and stone. Endlessly layered, timeless. 3 bottles available, $1187.98 +tax 

Clos de Tart Grand Cru Monopole (Pinot Noir) 2009. 100% destemmed and reflecting the girth of the hotter vintage, the 2009 is firmly in the zone and will stay there for another 15 years. Ripe cherries and sandalwood with bergamot and slight hints of chocolate. Despite the aromatic generosity the shape is medium-bodied and elegant, with a vibrant, electric finish. 3 bottles available, $1348.98 +tax 

 

Domaine Chavy-Chouet. First time in BC and I’m stoked. 7th generation winemaker Romanic Chavy is part of the vanguard making modern, electric white Burgundies with tension and purpose. Aging on lees but eschewing lees stirring, his fresh winemaking was informed by his godfather Francois Mikulski (more on him below) although his Chardonnays carry a bit more weight. I have: 

Chavy-Chouet Meursault Les Cases Têtes (Chardonnay) 2019. A “Case Tête” is a mind-bending puzzle, and they so named the vineyard due to the head-scratching effort it took to get anything to grow on this pebbly, limestone ground. Baked pear, toasted hazelnuts and lemon zest, silky delivery, gorgeously tart, chalky finish. 6 bottles available, $119.98 +tax 

Chavy-Chouet Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Champs Gain (Chardonnay) 2019. An easterly exposure and higher altitude give this climat just under Blagny a cooling effect, making lighter, more elegant Chard. Freshly cut peach and underripe pear aromas, a creamy, lush delivery that becomes a lightsaber on the finish. 6 bottles available, $173.98 +tax 

Chavy-Chouet Bourgogne Aligoté “Les Petits Poiriers” (Aligoté) 2019. One of the most expressive Aligotés that I’ve tried in a long time, from 60-year-old vines on a single lieu-dit. Grassy apple and nectarine notes, super linear on palate. Zippy and lovely. 6 bottles available, $43.98 +tax 

 

Domaine François Mikulski. The road Francois took towards winemaking could fill a miniseries: his father escaped occupied Poland and found himself fighting alongside the British in the Free Polish Forces, where he met François’ mother who was from Burgundy. François fell in love with Burgundian wine and in 1992 inherited some plots from his uncle Pierre Boillot, then spent the next 3 decades in the cellar doing the opposite of what his uncle did. Racy and immediate, with elegance obscuring the latent power. 

Mikulski Meursault (Chardonnay) 2019. Minerality takes centre stage with brown butter and cashews providing support. Green melon on the palate leads to the characteristic house zing. You only notice after its gone how heavy it actually was. 6 bottles available, $126.98 +tax 

Mikulski Bourgogne Aligote (Aligote) 2019. A rustic brew of green apple, lime and white pepper from a plot planted by François’ grandfather in 1922. A honeyed nose gives way to a taught, austere palate and a saline, quince-like finish. 10 bottles available, $48.98 +tax 

 

Domaine Marc Morey. The Morey name shows up in Burgundy more often than chocolate chips do in a cookie, all stemming from the vineyards that Frederic Morey bought when he returned from WW2. His kids split the holdings into a few domaines, and his great-granddaughter Sabine now runs Marc Morey, specializing in delightfully old-school renderings of the legendary Crus surrounding the village of Chassagne-Montrachet. Ambient yeast ferments, gentle battonage (lees stirring) and unrestricted malolactic are the family tools, and Sabine uses them to craft aromatic, generously textured Chardonnays of layer and length, like: 

Marc Morey Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Chenevottes (Chardonnay) 2019. A hella sunny climat, named after “chanvre” the Old French word for hemp, which covered these slopes well before the Cistercian monks replanted them to vines. Like receiving a hug from the Lemon God. Ripe peaches and truffle support the lemon preserve aromas, a full, creamy body fills all cracks with love until the citrus-rind astringent finish adds a welcome tension at the end. 12 bottles available, $161.98 

Marc Morey Chassagne-Montrachet Les Virondots (Chardonnay) 2019. The highest point in Chassagne, Virondots’ meager topsoil readily gives way to the limestone bedrock, making viticulture so challenging that few had attempted it before Frederic Morey made the Cru sing with mineral expressions below the ripe fruit. Orange zest and apple define the profile, with chalky austerity supporting the medium frame. Delicious now, unstoppable in 5 years. 12 bottles available, $161.98 +tax 

 

Anne Gros. Every crusty old grump who said that Burgundian winemaking “is a man’s art” are now just eddies in the wake of Anne Gros, an impressive feat considering that one of those grumps was her own father. One of the Cote de Nuits undisputed top winemakers, Anne now tends the cellar as her children tend the vines, driving collectors nuts with her tiny quantities and sorceress-like status. I have: 

Anne Gros Echezeaux Grand Cru (Pinot Noir) 2019. Just above Clos Vougeot, one of the larger Grand Crus. The licorice hues of the Cru are accompanied by dark chocolate, Asian five-spice and game notes. Tightly wound and bursting with potential, with sous-bois and orange rind flowing across the finish line. Masterful stuff, this is not its decade. 6 bottles available, $320.98 +tax 

 

Domaine des Perdrix. There are few left nowadays but several decades ago Burgundy, like many other estates in France, contained lots of non-descript, workaday houses that harvested heavy and sold off their juice in bulk. Perdrix was one such estate until the Devillard family purchased it in 1966 and set it on the road to stardom, slashing harvest tonnage and modernizing the cellar. Today Perdix is known for two things: 1) half of their holdings are either Premier Cru or Grand Cru, and 2) the house style favours depth and power with precise fruit expression. For example: 

Perdrix Vosne-Romanée (Pinot Noir) 2018. 60% whole cluster pressing from vineyards touching Clos Vougeot, a whopping 40% new oak used in the cellar: Here be Dragons. Dark and dangerous with cassis and licorice stirring the pot, a formidable frame, but not at the expense of lively acidity. Full body, big bones. 12 bottles available $139.98 +tax 

 

Domaine Faiveley. In 1934, with the world economy in ruins, Hitler ascending to power, and nobody buying Burgundy wines at all, Georges Faively founded the legendary Confrérie des Chevaliers du Tastevin (which meets to this day in the basement of Clos Vougeot), under the simple concept that if no one was buying them, at least the winemakers could get together and drink them. Founded in 1825, Faiveley has incrementally collected some of Burgundy’s best climats over two centuries (they own more Monopoles than any other estate), and now 7th generation vignerons Erwan and Eve Faiveley have steered the house style away from power (their dad François’ calling card) towards elegance and fidelity to terroir. I have: 

Faiveley Clos des Cortons Faiveley Grand Cru Monopole (Pinot Noir) 2017. Another one of the 5 Grand Cru Monopoles, acquired by the family in 1874, and sitting on one of the oldest vine-bearing hills in Burgundy, planted in the time of Charlemagne. An elegant vintage, with intense black cherry, vanilla and pomegranate. 2 bottles available, $330.98 +tax 

Faiveley Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru Clos des Issarts Monopole (Pinot Noir) 2017. The smallest appellation in all of Burgundy, with eastern exposure. A savoury, stony vibe supports the earthy raspberries and licorice notes. Built like a tiny little tank. 6 bottles available, $155.98 +tax 

Faiveley Puligny-Montrachet (Chardonnay) 2019. Soft oak notes around beeswax, jasmine and quince, finishes creamy and mineral. A welcome throwback style, delicate and lush. 6 bottles available, $126.98 +tax 

Faiveley Chassagne-Montrachet (Chardonnay) 2019. Stone fruits and candied grapefruit zest (yes) atop a rainwater minerality. The oak is more on nose than palate, with vanillin and lychee preceding a long, slightly minty finish. 6 bottles available, $117.98 +tax 

Faiveley Vosne-Romanée (Pinot Noir) 2015. Managed to snag a back vintage of this perfumed, very pretty Vosne. Roses and strawberries over tomato leaf and dark cherry notes. Very much in the zone, lovely. 6 bottles available, $138.98 +tax 

 

Benoit Ente. A tiny maison run by Benoit and his aunt, farming vineyards bequeathed from his grandparents in and around the village of Puligny-Montrachet. It’s a simple operation, they pick the grapes earlier than most and age the wines in large foudres with no fining. That’s pretty much it. Lucky for Benoit that he farms some of the best plots in the village; he doesn’t really need to do much more. New to BC, I’m stoked to have: 

Benoit Ente Puligny-Montrachet (Chardonnay) 2018. Lemon essence and jasmine intertwine with brioche and Anjou pear. Large and friendly with zippy tension on the back end. Gorgeous stuff. 12 bottles available, $159.98 +tax 

 

Gerard Raphet. Neal Martin called Gerard Raphet one of the best “under the radar producers” in Burgundy. A quiet man making civilized wines, Raphet practices very light extraction and a fraction of new oak, even on his Grand Crus, so although Gerard is quiet, his vineyards are loud. He took over from his father 20 years ago and makes wine with his daughter Virgine in Morey-Saint-Denis. I have: 

Gerard Raphet Clos Vougeot Grand Cru (Pinot Noir) 2011. Bright red fruits amongst the roses in the dirt. Finely structured frame, with ripe fruit on palate followed by a smoky mushroom vibe on the long finish. Tastes like forever. 3 bottles available, $304.98+tax 

Gerard Raphet Chambolle-Musigny (Pinot Noir) 2018. A bright, sunny Chambolle with notes of green herbs and mushrooms amidst the sour cherry and ripe plum notes. 6 bottles available, $159.98 +tax 

 

Domaine Latour-Giraud. When the Latour and Giraud families merged in 1958 (Burgundy is one of the world’s last places where peeps still marry for land), they brought together a combined 4 centuries of viticulture. Specializing almost entirely in the village of Meursault (with a notable exception below), Jean-Pierre Latour has pioneered low-intervention winemaking in the village, using ambient yeasts, lees again and minimal racking, and the style can best be called Retro-Modern, as the wines are generous but still tightly wound. I have: 

Latour-Giraud Meursault 1er Cru 1er Cru Meursault-Genevrières (Chardonnay) 2018. Named after the juniper trees that the grape vines replaced, the limestone-laced Genevrières Cru is known locally for massive body and nutty aromas. Latour-Giraud’s expression tones down the huge, with white flowers and orange rind prevailing. Elegant and supercharged on the finish. 12 bottles available, $144.98 +tax 

Latour-Giraud Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Champs Canet (Chardonnay) 2018. Bordering Meursault, Champs Canet is a crumbly-wumbly of marl and limestone with limited topsoil, and hues a shade lighter than many other Pulignys. Orchard blossom and almonds on the nose, with hints of petrol. Mouth-filling but laser-tight on the finish. 12 bottles available, $164.98 +tax 

 

Domaine Pierre Labet. Although the Labet name can be traced back 500 years in the Beaune wine trade, François Labet himself is more contemporarily associated with the venerated Chateau de la Tour, where he is the head winemaker, producing some of the most sought-after Clos Vougeot in the world. His home label is no side-hustle, though, as his family accrued amazing vineyards around Beaune over the years, vinified at the same facility (and by the same team) as Chateau de la Tour. When asked about his house style, François said “I think I’m making pre-World-War 2 wines with modern techniques and equipment.” We have: 

Pierre Labet Meursault Les Tillets (Chardonnay) 2018. The highest site in Meursault, sitting just above Les Narvaux, Les Tillets produces focused, mineral Chards with poise and charm. Citrus notes rule the nose, with slight buttered peach notes on palate but not on the finish. Zingy and zangy. 6 bottles available, $132.98 +tax 

Pierre Labet Beaune Clos des Monsnieres (Chardonnay) 2018. Lush Beaune fruit (peach, butter, buttered peaches, peachy butter) is restrained by lemon oil and orange zest, as well as a bracingly fresh acid profile. I’d like the finish to integrate better, 3 years would take care of that. 6 bottles available, $100.98 +tax 

 

Domaine Philippe Gavignet. Elegant wines from a village certainly capable of the opposite: many Nuits-St-Georges can be Tannin-o-sauruses with ferrous frames and only slight glimpses of the terrified fruit imprisoned therein, but Philippe Gavignet leads with soft beauty, partially due to the old vines he inherited from the 3 Gavignets before him. With his son Benoit, he farms around NSG and Haute-Côtes de Nuits, practicing moderate extraction in the winery towards finessed, silky wines like these: 

Philippe Gavignet Nuits-Saintt-Georges 1er Cru Les Pruliers (Pinot Noir) 2019. Planted in 1974 at the bottom of the Pruliers Cru where the soils are limestoniest, this accordingly well-structured NSG is tempered by dusty chocolate, cinnamon and blackberry, as well as Philippe’s softer touch. Not ready yet but not as far off as other NSGs. 12 bottles available, $138.98 +tax 

Domaine Stephane Magnien. Although organic viticulture is widespread in Burgundy it’s a relatively recent practice, but fourth generation winemaker Stephane can proudly claim that his family has never used pesticides, and have plowed by horse continuously over a century to preserve the living soil under their feet. These are finely finessed Pinots, almost entirely from the village of Morey-Saint-Denis, aged in only 10% new barrels, and the Magnien family is known locally for using “Pinot Tordu”, a tiny-berried aromatic clone of Pinot from old vines. I have: 

Stephane Magnien Morey-Saint-Denis 1er Cru “Cuvee aux Petit Noix” (Pinot Noir) 2018. A unique blend of two mid-slope Premier Crus, Petit Noix is one of the more corpulent MSDs that Stephane produces. A complex beast, with gamey blackberry emerging on the nose, with mineral and herbal flavours accompanying the fruit on palate. The tannins are fine but will better integrate in 5 years. 6 bottles available, $133.98 

David Butterfield. If we’re honest, David Butterfield is what most of us in this industry really want to be: a Canadian who French people think is cool. Embraced by local winemakers (he apprenticed under a few of them), the Burgundians like David for his traditional, respectful approach to many of the region’s best fruit. I like him because he keeps releasing reasonably priced, awesome back vintages like these: 

Butterfield Beaune 1er Cru Les Teurons (Pinot Noir) 2009. Pretty widely considered to be the best Beaune Cru for reds, smack dab in the middle of the strip of 1er Crus near the town. Black cherry and spicy blackberry. There’s always a bit more depth and darkness to the Teurons fruit profile, elevated by the warmer 2009, but this is no Mallomar, a precise frame holds the extra baggage perfectly and there’s 10 more years in this no probs. 6 bottles arriving next week, $110.98 +tax 

Butterfield Corton Grand Cru Blanc (Chardonnay) 2015. Enter the Pleasuredome. Slightly hotter and rounder than Corton-Charlemagne around the corner, white Cortons are as close as Burgundy gets to erotic fan fiction. Ripe pear and bruised apple shade the soft minerality and weight, a full body flows towards an electric finish with great tension. I’m blushing. So freaking gorgeous. 6 bottles arriving next week, $238.98 +tax 

Domaine Joseph Roty. With 11 continuous generations making wine, the Roty family is both one of the oldest Burgundian winemaking families and owners of some of Burgundy’s oldest vines. Even by the standards of Burgundy this is a miniscule production, and by tasting and looking at the bottles one might conclude that Roty thinks the last 20 years didn’t happen. Full destemming and liberal new oak usage aren’t what the cool kids are doing nowadays, but no one cares - with juice this good I’ll happily live in the past. I have: 

Joseph Roty Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru Les Fontenys (Pinot Noir) 2017. A 1er Cru that’s due for a promotion, the Les Fontenys plot touches 2 Grand Crus (Mazi-Chambertin and Ruchottes-Chambertin). Already a sober village (speaking only allegorically), this Gevrey-Chambertin hues darkly, with intensely sanguineous notes around the dark cherry, orange peel and pepper notes. From 80+ year-old vines. 3 bottles available, $237.98 +tax 

MACONNAIS 

Domaine Barraud. Father and son team Daniel and Julien Barraud have been spinning gold from the lands that Daniel’s father bought in 1905, all around the totemistic local landmark the Roche de Vergisson, a rocky promontory that looms so large over the region you can find out where you are just by seeing where it is. There aren’t many “hacks” into Burgundy anymore, the value villages of 15 years ago (Meursault, St. Aubin) are now level with their contemporaries in price, but the right Maconnais plots in the hands of amazing producers like these rival the magic of the Cote d’Or’s best wines, at a fraction of the price. I have: 

Barraud Macon-Vergisson La Roche (Chardonnay) 2018. The highest plot in the appellation, simply one of Burgundy’s best remaining values. Intense lemon oil vibes – very Chassagne-ish – over a layered intensity of chalk and lime. 12 bottles available, $50.98 +tax 

Barraud Pouilly-Fuissé La Roche 2018 (Chardonnay) 2018. Same altitude as the previous “La Roche” vineyard, but this future Premier Cru (after 2020) is at the summit of the Roche de Vergisson. From 50-year-old vines, with apple peel, flint and light sea spray over a thicker, buzzy body. Loooong finish. 12 bottles available, $74.98 +tax 

Barraud Pouilly-Fuissé La Verchère Vieilles Vignes (Chardonnay) 2018. A cooler, limestone-rich site underneath the Roche de Vergisson and (conveniently) behind the Barraud’s home. 70+-year-old vines. White flowers, with faint hints of smoke over fresh lemon and chalk. 12 bottles available, $74.98 +tax 

Barraud Saint-Veran Arpege (Chardonnay) 2018. From the rocky Arpege plot (12 inches of topsoil before you hit limestone), this Veran is a live wire of green apple and honey dipped in citronella. Bracing, stony finish. 6 bottles available, $44.98 +tax 

Eve & Michel Rey. Pretty easy to practice low-intervention winemaking when there’s just two of you. Husband and wife team Eve and Michel pretty much do everything themselves, making modern, energy-filled Pouilly-Fuissé from around the Roche de Vergisson. Ambient yest ferments and minimal sulphites. Although they’ve only been at it a little while, they are every inch contemporaries of Domaine Barraud in quality and spirit. I have: 

Eve & Michel Rey Pouilly Fuissé La Maréchaude (Chardonnay) 2018. A stony, steep south-facing lieu-dit (future 1er Cru after 2020) on the slopes of Roche de Vergisson with chalk and clay underneath. Pomelo and hazelnut lurk under the citrus and slight smoke. The ripest of the bunch packs a punch. 12 bottles available, $58.98 +tax 

Eve & Michel Rey Pouilly Fuissé En Buland (Chardonnay) 2017. Aged a bit longer in neutral oak, this is the coolest lieu-dit of the bunch, sitting higher and facing northwest. 70-year-old vines. Racy and tasty with fresh lemon and flint. Lip-smacking finish, it zings like a wing ding. 12 bottles available, $49.98 +tax 

Eve & Michel Rey Pouilly Fuissé Les Crays (Chardonnay) 2017. Southeast facing plot, kind of a mid point between the two styles above. Will be a 1er Cru after 2020. Gorgeous floral notes beside the limeade, rich on palate, medium zing. 12 bottles available, $51.98 +tax 

CHABLIS 

Roland Lavantureux. New to BC, and not a moment too soon. Roland put his name on the family label in 1978, back when grapes were just one of the crops produced by the enterprising Laventureux family. Roland expanded his vineyard holdings five-fold, and now plays a back seat driver to his sons Arnaud and David, who run this marvelous, forward-looking maison We have: 

Lavantureux Chablis 1er Cru Vau de Vey (Chardonnay) 2018. Clay and limestone soils under one of the steepest plots in the village. Unsurprising gravel notes underscore the yellow plum and citrus rind, the palate is pretty big (reflecting the vintage) but the whole thing hums with energy from front to back, 12 bottles available, $69.98 +tax 

Lavantureux Chablis Vauprin (Chardonnay) 2018. Although only a lieu-dit in the middle of nowhere and not a 1er Cru, the Vauprin is considered locally to be the estate’s signature offering. The high-lying, south-facing plot gives the perfect blend of ripeness and tension, with smoke and hazelnut lurking beneath the citrus, with some apparent lees aging permeating the nose. 6 bottles available, $61.98 +tax 

Garnier & Fils. Although the Garnier family has been growing grapes for decades, it was brothers Xavier and Jerome Garnier who started making wine out of them in 1996, whereas their dad sold the crops to neighboring houses. Admirably bucking the general trend, the bros aren’t afraid to go big, picking later than anyone around them and allowing long, ambient yeast fermentations before aging in ginormous barrels. We have: 

Garnier & Fils Chablis 1er Cru Mont de Milieu (Chardonnay) 2018. One of the 1er Crus most worthy of a promotion, sharing the same soil and aspect with the Grand Crus just a bit further north. Mont de Milieu makes big, ripe Chardonnay and the Garnier bros are most definitely here for it. The limestone chalkiness is ever-present, but lush pineapple and mango accompany the quince and lemon pastry. Great value. 12 bottles available, $65.98 +tax  

Garnier & Fils Bourgogne Epineuil (Pinot Noir) 2018. “Wait, what? There’s no such thing as red Chablis?!? What manner of sorcery be this?” Yes, you’re indeed correct, Chablis is only white wines, but when winemakers from there want to get their red on, they go just a bit down the road to Epineuil, a nearby hamlet with the same soils as Chablis, where Pinot is king. The Pinots from here act like they were raised by Syrah: peppery, meaty notes accompany the beaming red fruits, with smoke and blueberry around the fringes. What sets Epineuil apart from Burgundy (besides 150km) is the softer tannins – you can drink these immediately – and the energy of a ferret who has binged on No-Doz and MMA pay-per-view. Garnier’s version is elegant and racy, with candied pomegranate, smoke and roses on the nose, followed by a silky medium body and ultra-fresh finish. Best value of this list. 24 Bottles available, $39.98 +tax 

Maison Benjamin Laroche – La Manufacture. As kids tend to do, Benjamin had to go on a walkabout and escape the legacy of his legendary Chablis family (the Laroche name is 7 generations old, there) before returning home to put down roots, figuratively and literally. Having managed wineries all over France as a young man, he fell back in love with Chardonnay and the Chablis terroir, and set about trying to perfect expressions of those vineyards. As such, Benjamin does very little to the juice from the small plots he farms himself, his wines are elegant and honest, showing great value. 

La Manufacture Chablis Grand Cru Blanchot (Chardonnay) 2018. Pretty much all of the citrus fruits own some real estate in this nose, which evolves so quickly in front of you that the minerality seems to come and go as it pleases. Although Blanchot is the southernmost of the Grand Crus, it’s mostly known for elegant, mineral expressions, and this 2018 – despite the hotter year – is no exception. 12 bottles available, $116.98 +tax 

 

That’s it! We made it! We’re done! Coming soon: American Epics, Rhone wines and the River District Piedmont Offer…. 

Until next time, Happy Drinking! 

Jordan Carrier

Tenuta di Arceno Chianti Classico Riserva 2018

Mentions of the historic Arceno estate date back to the year 1000 when it was cited as a small independent community located in Siena, Italy. Over the next few decades, the estate passed through ownership of two historically prominent Italian families – the Del Taja family and the Piccolomini family. In the early 1500s, it was the Tajas that expanded the estate, building the first villas on the property. In 1829, the estate was purchased by the illustrious Piccolomins who added to the grandeur of the estate by building gardens, lakes and many of the villas that still stand today. Continuing on the legacy, Tenuta di Arceno was acquired by legendary California winemaker Jess Jackson and his wife Barbara Banke in 1994.

Tenuta di Arceno has a diverse portfolio which centers around the native Sangiovese grape in the Chianti Classico collection.

A word from our Director of Buying, Dave Smith:

"With a rich and storied history, this Tuscan estate is a must try. A very modern and forward style of Chianti with deep concentration and rich, ripe fruit balanced by great structure. I get drawn to this wine every time I taste it. With a couple of hours of decanting, this wine becomes more and more expressive! Pair this with wild boar ragu or osso buco and you won’t be disappointed. Time and time again this wine has been a staff favourite. A great gift wine or treat yourself!"

92 points, James Suckling

Purchase it here.

Arguably the greatest vintage of Brunello di Montalcino ever!

Brunello di Montalcino 2016: Arguably the greatest vintage of Brunello di Montalcino ever!

 I've received quite a few bottles of the magical 2016 vintage from Brunello di Montalcino.  This vintage leaves most people speechless, regardless of personal taste. Even if you are not sure which bottle (or bottles) to get, it would be hard to go wrong with any of these excellent wines. 2016 Stands out as the strongest vintage ever in Brunello di Montalcino, a legendary vintage, thanks to a textbook growing season!

 Argiano Brunello di Montalcino 2016: 

 Argiano's Brunello di Montalcino is distinguished by its elegance and its deep ruby red color. It presents a good concentration on the mid-palate and a persistent aftertaste, with a rounded and voluptuous body, and interesting, silky tannins. 97 Decanter. 

$74.99 per bottle plus tax. 

 

 Il Poggione Brunello di Montalcino 2016:  

 Incredible effort for one of the largest estates in Montalcino. This estate produces stunning wines vintage after vintage. Keep this one for at least a decade! 97 Vinous, 96 Wine Spectator. 

$84.98 per bottle plus tax. 

 

 Castiglion Del Bosco Brunello di Montalcino 2016: 

 Complexity, superb structure, and an inviting, mouth-filling palate are the hallmarks of this Sangiovese grown in the 42-hectare Capanna vineyard facing towards the Mediterranean Sea. A garnet-flecked ruby red, it releases generous, emphatic fragrances classic to Sangiovese, developing a near-endless progression notable for its beautiful balance. 97 Decanter, 99 JS. 

$95.98 per bottle plus tax. 

 We also have 6 magnums (1.5L) available of the 2016 vintage: $214.99 plus tax.

 Le Ragnaie Brunello di Montalcino 2016: 

Blended from Le Ragnaie's scattered vineyards, this provides a wide-angle snapshot of Montalcino’s varied territory, violets and Mediterranean scrub meeting wild strawberry, stone and an intriguing earthiness. It also encapsulates Sangiovese’s buoyancy, coming across as mid-weight at first then building with power as firm, dusty tannins wrap around a tangy core. The finish is energetic and uplifting - an elegantly sculpted Brunello. 

 $119.98 per bottle plus tax. 96 Wine Spectator 

 Sesti Brunello di Montalcino 2016: 

The Sesti estate's vineyards are in the enviable position of being on the southern slopes of Montalcino, where some of the most prestigious Brunello comes from. Giuseppe Sesti is considered the leading winemakers of the region. 94 Wine Advocate 

 $147.98 per bottle plus tax. 

New Zealand Pinot Noir and Riesling plus Canada's top Pinot Noir!

Hi wine friends,

I hope you are enjoying the summer. There are a few new exciting arrivals in the Vintages Room this week.

Leeuwin Estate 2018 Art Series Chardonnay:

Definitely one of my favourite producers of Chardonnay in Australia. The Margaret River is such an amazing winegrowing region.

Immaculate, powerful, intense nose with purity and clarity of primary fruit characterised by pear, white peach, lime curd and custard apple. There are infinite layers of brioche, grilled hazelnuts, cinnamon quill, shaved nutmeg, black cardamom and almond meal. A thread of graphite in the background adds elegant complexity.

"Let's put it this way. This is the closest I have come to awarding a wine 100 points...Stellar wine from a stellar vintage. The remarkable this is that this is a wine 100 percent barrel fermented in new French oak barriques with regular lees stirring for 11 months - and it certainly doesn't taste excessive, or even slightly oak. It has such high-fidelity purity with complex seductive aromatics of vanilla bean and light oatmeal with a cutting minerality and spicy lift. But the palate, oh the palate. This is where things start to explode. Power, poise an​d persistence with a dry savouriness balancing the intense ripe fruit. It ​is such a long finish with an ever so slightly, charry finish completing a remarkable wine".​ 99-plus/100 Ray Jordan, The West Australian, 27 February 2021​

​$115.98 per bottle plus tax.

Champagne Varnier Fannier Grand Cru St. Denis:

Incredible Blanc de Blancs made in tiny quantities. The history of this estate dates back to 1860 when the Fanniere family began growing grapes and selling them to Champagne negociant houses. It was only in 1950 that the family started producing champagne under their own name.

$89.99 per bottle plus tax.

Rippon Mature Vine Riesling 2019: 95 Points JS

A warm & productive summer put plenty of flesh on this wine. The fruit is issued from Rippon’s mature vines, whose root hairs have invaded the schist rock below. Lurking towards the end of the first mouthful is substantial phenolic power and it soon starts to take charge of the wine… and give it its sense of place.

Rippon's 2019 Mature Vine Riesling strikes a winning balance between fresh green apple, tangy citrus and spring-like florals. It's medium-bodied (12% alcohol) and almost dry, with great concentration and length.

$49.98 per bottle plus tax.

Rippon Mature Vine Pinot Noir 2017: 99 Points JS

The farm voice of a distinct parcel of land: Rippon. On the western board of Roy’s Bay, Lake Wanaka, Rippon’s north-facing escarpment forms the meeting point of terminal moraines and coarse gravels, all based in schist, on which some of the region’s earliest vines were planted. Rippon is a Wine issued from all of the fully developed Pinot Noir vines growing in this land.

This offers aromas of violets, blueberries, red and dark cherries, fragrant, freshly cracked black pepper and wet dark stones. Complex, but still tightly wound and reserved. The palate is very concentrated, dense and elegantly poised with such powerful tannin, carrying concentrated blueberry and dark-cherry flavors long. Really taut, fully ripe and mouth wateringly intense pinot noir. Dark cherry-pit freshness to close. From bio dynamically grown grapes. Drinkable now, but better in five years.

$76.98 per bottle plus tax.

Little Engine Gold Label Pinot Noir 2018:

A deep purple colour, luxuriant with dark cherry, strawberry, and rhubarb aromas, layered with notes of chocolate and subtle vanilla. The palate is pleasing on entry with inviting dark fruit, cassis, cocoa, and hints of cola, along with savoury notes inviting us to take another sip. Tannins are round and rich. Good acid balance with a generous finish. The winemaking team recommend patience and a favourable cellaring environment to encourage the development of alluring tertiary characteristics. This wine will age beautifully through 2025.

95 Points - Gold, Decanter World Wine Awards 2021. The highest scoring Canadian Pinot Noir!

$69.98 per bottle plus tax.

Langley Vintages Room New Arrivals and Familiar Classics

Wine Enthusiasts, we received fantastic new vintages of familiar classics and some new additions!

Belong Wine Co. Chasing the Sun 2019 Rosé:

Tasting Notes: Grapefruit, blood orange, jasmine, lavender, herbs de Provence and sage on the nose. On the palate, loads of citrus, orange blossom and salinity. Begging for a beach or mountain top - pairs incredibly well with sunsets.

Mourvèdre, Cinsault and Grenache blend. Eldorado County, Napa. Only 5 barrels produced.

Belong Wine Co Rose

$41.98 per bottle plus tax.

Belong Wine Co. El Dorado County Mourvèdre 2018: 

Tasting Notes: Blackcurrant, dark raspberry, tea leaf, cinnamon, cardamom, white pepper, rosemary, sage, and fennel. On the palate the initial burst of bright red fruit, spice and paprika. A very fresh finish.

Only 5 barrels produced. 75% whole cluster and neutral French Oak. 

Belong Wine Co El Dorado

$57.98 per bottle plus tax. 

About the Winery: Belong Wine Co. was founded in 2017 to celebrate everything founders Alli and Bertus van Zyl are passionate about. Pulling from their field journals, the Belong Wine Co. label represents their fascination of the outdoors and drinking wine in the wilderness. The company also serves as members of 1% for the planet, meaning at least one percent of their yearly profits is funneled to environmental causes. A simple and endearing mission, the van Zyls hope their wine inspires people to go out and do what they love, always with a bottle of wine in tow.

Psi 2017 Ribera Del Duero: 

Tasting Notes: Made by Peter Sisseck of the coveted Pingus! Sisseck is the producer of the most expensive of all Spanish wines, the legendary Pingus.  Gorgeous black cherries, blackberries and black truffles on the nose, following through with balanced fruit, and fine tannins. 94 Points James Suckling.

Psi Ribero

$65.98 per bottle plus tax. 

Freemark Abbey Sycamore Vineyard 2016: 

Tasting Notes: A very good vintage in Napa. Freemark Abbey has held exclusive sourcing rights to the Sycamore Vineyard since 1980; the vineyard consistently produces one of Freemark Abbey's acclaimed Cabernets.

Located on the famed Rutherford Bench, adjacent to the Staglin Family, To Kalon, Heitz Bella Oaks and Harlan Estate vineyards. 95 Points Wine Enthusiast.

Freemark Sycamore

$134.98 per bottle plus tax.

Chimney Rock Cabernet Sauvignon Stags Leap District Napa 2018: 

Tasting Notes: The Stags Leap District comprises some of the most coveted vineyard land in the world for Cabernet Sauvignon. This wine showcases the region's singular ability to produce Cabernets of lush texture and tremendous ageability. 94 Points Wine Enthusiast.

Chimney Rock

$147.99 per bottle plus tax.

Fontodi Flaccianello Della Pieve 2017: 

Tasting Notes: Flaccianello Della Pieve is the result of a selection of the finest Sangiovese grapes which come from the best vineyards of Fontodi and are grown with only natural methods. The vineyards are located in the " Conca d'oro " of Panzano in Chianti, a magnificent natural amphitheater blessed with a unique microclimate and dominated but thousand-year-old Parish Church of San Leolino a Facciono. Definitely one of the standout wines of the 2017 Vintage! A stellar wine that needs time!

One of my all-time favourite Italian producers. 97 Points Vinous, 96 Points Wine Advocate.

Fontodi

$165.99 per bottle plus tax.

Cheers,

Quinot

 

Prices are per bottle and do not include bottle deposits or taxes

Prices as of publication date

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