Tagged with 'everything wine'

98-Point Wines for Under $100

Let’s raise a glass to ninety-eight,
For wine, that score is pretty great!
It’s two points from immaculate!
(does that not make sense? well, too late)

I doubt that you could ever hate
A wine with points of ninety-eight!
With Christmas coming, let’s go straight
to two wines you’ll want by the crate:

TeHo Malbec 2014, Mendoza, Argentina. A gloriously Old World Malbec from the New World, this drinks like a Cahors stirred with a lightsaber. Meaning “Blood of the Earth” in the local indigenous tongue, TeHo is sourced from a non-grafted Uco Valley vineyard called Tomal, planted in 1955, and the 90% Malbec is co-fermented with 10% of… well, everything: Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc and, if the beautifully mineral finish is any indication, a bunch of rocks. Pulls off the rare trick of intense concentration without the accompanying baby fat; red cherries, violets and spice surround the nose, the medium-full body and mineral finish are lifted by a beautiful acidity that’s more Médoc than Mendoza. Stretches the boundaries of what “Mendoza” means, Malbec-lovers and Francophiles alike can find a lot to trip out on, here, this is fabulous and layered. Exclusive to this store. Currently gorgeous but has the structural fortitude to cellar like a Jedi, and can do many push-ups:
98 points Tim Atkins
Red Wine of the Year (2017) Tim Atkins
Top 20 Wines of 2017, Decanter
Top 100 Wines of 2017, Wine and Spirits
5 6-packs available, $75.99 +tax

Yarra Yering Dry Red No. 2 2012, Yarra Valley, Australia. Last year’s Australian Winemaker of the Year Sarah Crowe returns with another whizz-bang Shiraz from the cool(er) climate of Yarra Valley, near Melbourne. Hard to describe Yarra wines except by discounting what they aren’t: they don’t have the confected fruit compote of McLaren Vale, they don’t have the black pepper of Barossa, nor are they as light footed as Norther Rhône Syrahs or rigidly structured like Margaret River wines. What they do have is a friendly, comfort-food exterior that can somewhat belie enormous reservoirs of thermo-nuclear inner strength.  Often called an “iron fist in a velvet glove”, Dry Red No 2 is teeming with white pepper, red Nibs and baking chocolate, the body is plenty full but can still do pull-ups, the finish – and it’s famous for this – peers into the portal to forever. Outstanding vintage for a wine notorious for its vintage variation. 98 points James Halliday, 4 6-packs available, $92.49 +tax

Until next time, Happy Drinking!

Vi-know more about Bordeaux with Rob Carras!

Time to learn more about the world-famous wine region, Bordeaux! We sat down with our South Surrey store manager, Rob Carras to learn more about this varietal, its flavours, the region, and of course what foods it pairs best with! You can watch the full video on our YouTube channel or read the full transcript below!

bordeaux-wines

Hi everyone, my name is Rob Carras and I'm the store manager at Everything Wine in South Surrey. Today I'm going to tell you about the World-famous wine region, Bordeaux!

Region and Flavour Profiles
Red Bordeaux wines are often medium to full-bodied, with notes of black currant, cherry, plum and cedar. The vintage and the region will have a lot of factor into the quality of the wine. On the left-bank, you'll get wines with more structure, more age-worthiness whereas the right-bank, more plummy, plushy fruit, and more approachable in their youth.

Varietals in a Bordeaux blend
Typical varietals you'll find in Bordeaux are Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, a little bit of Petite Verdot and a little bit of Malbec. Actually, the first Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot vines originated in Bordeaux, France.

Food Pairing
Now to my favourite part, the food and wine pairing! Red Bordeaux goes really well with pot roast, black pepper steak - the tannins in the wine really cut through the fat in the meat and the flavours are definitely complimented by that black pepper on the steak. If you're vegetarian try it with roast potatoes or a green bean casserole!

Price
Here at Everything Wine, we have Bordeaux in every price range. We have lots of option under $20, much more approachable and everyday drinkers, all the way up to the most sought-after wines in the world, up to $8,500 per bottle!

Interested in try a Bordeaux wine for yourself? Be sure to check out our Bordeaux release, happening September 21st!

MasterClass Review: Burgundy

Yasmine_Profile
A NEW FIRST: MY MASTERCLASS EXPERIENCE


It's nearly impossible to forget some of your "firsts". Your first job, your first concert, and of course your first love. Those moments are impactful. Through the years they have stayed with you; they have even possibly shaped you. The beautiful thing about life is, there are still so many "firsts" left to experience.

On January 19, 2017 I was privileged to experience a new first. At 6:30pm, I sat down for my first masterclass on Burgundy with the brilliant Wine Connoisseur

Jordan Carrier. Now don't get me wrong, I've had plenty of good Pinot Noir and Chardonnay in my lifetime....but this was different. Why you ask? Not only was this a scholastic experience, it was a gastronomical one as well. For each wine, there was a perfectly paired morsel as delicious and unique as its counterpart. You may have came just for the wine but you leave trying to plan your next dinner party. Seven fantastic wines and seven beautiful hors d'oeuvres later, how could you not! Now let's talk about these Burgundian beauties.

We started tasting in an untraditional manor, red to white. Between you and I, I was just so excited to try the wines, I didn't even bother to ask why. Yet, if I were to guess, I'd say it has to do with Chardonnay's full bodied nature vs. Pinot Noir's delicate profile. Anyway I digress.

We started off with Louis Jadot Chambolle-Musigny 1er Cru Les Sentiers, 2007. With a price point of $117.99 I had very high expectations, and all I can say is "I get it." This was one of my highlights of the evening. It was as if I had just been hugged. It had this subtle, understated yet undeniable beauty. It had the classic sour cherry and forest floor, with a finish that was gentle and smooth. The pure definition of terroir was in my glass, and memorable it will always be. It was paired with beef tar tar, mandarin oranges, and fennel on a rice cracker. Simply wonderful.

Onto wine #2. Camus Pere et Fils Charmes-Chambertin Grand Cru, 2005 The price tag of $124.49 may seem hefty but believe it or not, that's a steal for a Grand Cru from Burgundy. The price may be "cheap" but the quality sure isn't. When they normally start at $300, I understand why one may feel apprehensive, but worry not! There are notes of riper fruit coupled with aromas of intense candied cherries that have been coated in dirt. It was slightly more tannic than the 1st wine but could easily lay down for a few more years. This was paired with organic beet carpaccio.

Wine #3 was A.F. Gros Vosne-Romanee Mazieres, 2011. The beauty of having a flight of wines of the same varietal in front of you is the ability to compare. This vintage seemed to have more tannins and higher alcohol levels, with aromas of cherry cola. It's still a young guy, so I'd be interested to see him man up in a few years.

Wine #4 was Daniel Rion Nuits-St-Georges Grandes Vignes, 2013. Now this would be the more affordable of the bunch (red wines) at $68.99. It was paired with a dark chocolate truffle that contained a core of lavender infused white chocolate. It stood up to the earthy mint finish of the wine. Now I have a confession to make...I used to be a Chardonnay hater (Don't judge me, I didn't know better!). I have now seen the light, have embraced it entirely, and urge you other Chardonnay haters to give it a chance! However, my only stipulation is to start in Burgundy.

Which brings me to wine #5 Olivier Leflaive Meursault Narvaux, 2013. If this was high school and there was a vote for prom king, this would win. It was bright, had a stunning nose of lemon and golden apple with pleasant minerality. It was paired with a delicious almond sweet pea mascarpone soup.

Wine #6 was Louis Jadot Savigny-les-Beaunes Clos les Guettes ,2012. Louis Jadot has yet to steer me wrong and this was no exception. At $50.99, picking up this bottle of wine for a special occasion would be highly advised. Very fruit driven, with notes of apricot and white peach. This was paired with a French classic, coq-au-vin.

Last of all, wine #7 was Joseph Drouhin Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru Embazees, 2013. I'd say this wine has potential at $121.99 but still 5 years too early. Still has fruit but I found the acid rather high. It was great that it was it was paired with crispy pork belly, bocconcini and honeydew. The acid in the wine cut right through the fat resulting in perfection.

I don't know about you but I'm getting pretty thirsty and hungry talking about all of this food and wine. I implore you to find a class at Everything Wine, sign up and enjoy your next "First Experience". You will come away equipped with more knowledge and confidence, all while having had a memorable night.
Cheers!
- Yasmine

Wine & Food Pairing: Sushi

Three words best describe summer dining: light, fresh, and delicious. For me, nothing satisfies these criteria better than a casual lunch on the patio of my favourite local sushi joint. After a quick glance at the menu, I’ve decided on an assortment of nigiri sushi and cucumber rolls. But the question remains: what to wash it down with?

The first and simplest principle of wine and food pairing is that wines, and other beverages, from the same region as the cuisine usually best complement it. Quality cold sake and light Japanese beer are among the best choices for my sushi lunch. While these options are certainly delicious, this is a wine blog after all, so let’s consider another approach to wine and food pairing by matching the weight, or richness, of the food with the weight, or body, of the wine. This rule of wine and food pairing opens up a world of palate-pleasing options. The crisp, clean profile of a New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc, or the mineral characteristic of a Chardonnay from Chablis, for example, complement the lightest fare, and the fresh cucumber rolls on my plate. Foods of a medium richness, such as the lighter yellowfin tuna, demand a richer, more full-bodied wine – an oaky California Chardonnay or a viscous Mosel Riesling – and the meatiest fish, like salmon or the richer, fatty tuna belly, not only stand up to a Burgundian Pinot Noir, they share the wine’s Umami taste. But pairing wine and food isn’t always about identifying similarities; in fact, finding the right contrast can highlight flavours and enhance both the food and the wine. An aromatic white wine, with just a touch of sweetness, for instance, pairs exquisitely with many spicy and savoury dishes. Like to go heavy on the wasabi? I certainly do, so today I will opt for an off-dry and aromatic white, an Alsatian Gewürztraminer, but an Argentine Torrontes or a BC Ehrenfelser would also do nicely.

If you would rather not bother fussing over the wine list, go for a nice sparkling wine. Bubbly is refreshing and lively, and it pairs well with the variety of flavours your sushi platter may offer. Extra-dry or Brut Champagne are best, if you have deep pockets, but if you’re looking for something more affordable, choose a fruity BC bubbly or an Italian Prosecco. Perhaps the best approach of all, when it comes to food and wine pairing, is to be courageous and experiment. Have fun with it, and you might discover something amazing. Cheers!
RORY'S SUSHI PICKS:

Pierre Sparr Gewürztraminer – France $20.99

Gunderloch Fritz's Riesling – Germany $16.99

Ochagavia Sauvignon Blanc – Chile $12.99

Planning your own sushi party?  Come in and let us help you choose from a wide variety of wines and sakes that will perfectly accompany your favourite sushi dishes.